Nuclear Medicine Technologist  What They Do

Just the Facts


Prepares, administers, and measures radioactive isotopes in therapeutic, diagnostic, and tracer studies using a variety of radioisotope equipment. Prepares stock solutions of radioactive materials and calculate doses to be administered by radiologists. Subjects patients to radiation. Executes blood volume, red cell survival, and fat absorption studies following standard laboratory techniques.

This career is part of the Health Science cluster Diagnostic Services pathway.


A person in this career:

  • Administers radiopharmaceuticals or radiation intravenously to detect or treat diseases, using radioisotope equipment, under direction of a physician.
  • Detects and maps radiopharmaceuticals in patients' bodies, using a camera to produce photographic or computer images.
  • Processes cardiac function studies, using computer.
  • Calculates, measures, and records radiation dosage or radiopharmaceuticals received, used, and disposed, using computer and following physician's prescription.
  • Produces a computer-generated or film image for interpretation by a physician.
  • Records and processes results of procedures.
  • Explains test procedures and safety precautions to patients and provides them with assistance during test procedures.
  • Prepares stock radiopharmaceuticals, adhering to safety standards that minimize radiation exposure to workers and patients.
  • Performs quality control checks on laboratory equipment or cameras.
  • Disposes of radioactive materials and stores radiopharmaceuticals, following radiation safety procedures.

Insider Info

Dig into the details and check out what people in this job have to say about their work.



Multimedia

Watch a one-minute video showing what it's like to work in this career or related careers


Nuclear Medicine Technologists

Working Conditions and Physical Demands

People who do this job report that:

  • You would often handle loads up to 20 lbs., sometimes up to 50 lbs. You might do a lot of lifting, carrying, pushing or pulling.
  • Work in this occupation involves use of protective items such as safety shoes, glasses, gloves, hearing protection, a hard hat, or personal flotation devices
  • Exposed to disease and infections more than once a month through work such as patient care, laboratory work, and sanitation control
  • Work in this occupation involves using your hands to hold, control, and feel objects more than one-third of the time
  • Work in this occupation requires being inside most of the time
  • Exposed to radiation more than once a month
  • Work in this occupation involves use of special protective items such as a breathing apparatus, safety harness, full protection suit, or radiation protection
  • Work in this occupation involves standing more than one-third of the time

Working in this career involves (physical activities):

  • Seeing clearly up close
  • Speaking clearly enough to be able to be understood by others
  • Identifying and understanding the speech of another person

Work Hours and Travel

  • Weekend work

Specialty and Similar Careers

Careers that are more detailed or close to this career:

  • Isotope Technologist --